Saturday, September 11, 2010

Middletown, America

This remains one of the few books I have read on 9-11 since 9-11. I can't ever bring myself to willingly plunge into the heart of darkness that day was, even in my beloved books. This one came along at the right time, in the right format for me; this is not a book of political arguments ( although it contains many ) or intelligently structured explanations- this is the story of a handful of women ( and their children ) who lost their husbands that day, and the forty or other so people interviewed and involved around those widow's loss, including fireman, police, neighbors, co-workers and on. It sits on my bookshelf and every now and then I look at it, glad I read it but never re-reading. I am sure one day it will be the right time and the right book again, and I will pick it up. Until then, maybe one of you would like to read the human stories of that day. If so, I recommend this book. Buy it here.
Jessica said...

I'll keep this book in mind. When I'm ready to read about that day...

the real mia said...

Jessica, you said it well. My memories of that day are still so dark and surreal. After all these years, I'm still not ready for the mediated versions of that event. Maybe one day.

michelle said...

I remember hearing about this book.

I'll never forget that day, who I was with, what was said.

All the lines were jammed and I couldn't get in touch with Bruce. He was on the train into Manhattan when it hit the fan.

Sad and scary day.

Elizabeth said...

Thanks for the recommendation. My "favorite" book about 9/11 is by Don DeLillo -- a novel called "Falling Man." It's truly extraordinary --

Jeanne said...

My dad died, at the age of 87, about 6 weeks before 9/11 happened, but I can remember him talking about Pearl Harbor, and the shock and horror and anger everyone felt when we were attacked. In some ways, I'm glad he wasn't here to have to live through that again.

Julia said...

We were living in NYC on 9/11. One of the great comforts of being there was that everyone you met was ALIVE and had a story of survival. It ameliorated the fear, even as we all waited for the next plane or bridge or tunnel to blow.

Annie said...

I was working as an elementary school media specialist that day. We turned on the TV's in back rooms, but we were instructed not to tell the children. The next day, the Assistant Principal made an announcement on the loudspeaker referencing the event, scaring the children into thinking it was happening again, until we reassured them. One little girl, I remember, I took to the guidance counselor, and the next year, I asked her to be one of my news reporters for the morning news. Every one of our children will remember where they were and what they were doing, and what happened when they got home and those who didn't know were told by their parents.

Maggie May said...

Elizabeth I have that DeLillo, and it is really good.

Maggie May said...

Ed and I watched an hour or so of the History channel's 9-11 home shot footage last night. It's still hard to comprehend.

Marion said...

I've been reading her books for years. She's a great writer. I can't wait to find this one at the library. Thanks for sharing it! Blessings!

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