Monday, October 5, 2009

Anne Frank on Film, July 22, 1941




The first, and only known video of Anne Frank released. Anne at age 12, leaning out the window of her apartment, watching a wedding. Anne died aged 15 of typhus in the German concentration camp of Bergen-Belsen, seven months after her arrest and just two weeks before British and Canadian troops liberated the camp.

Like many, Anne Frank has occupied a singular and simultaneously horror stricken and awe inspired
place in my heart since I myself was about 12 years old. She was gorgeous, innocent, intelligent, talented, unique, fiercely alive, and doomed to die in such a horrible way that words fail.


And finally I twist my heart round again, so that the bad is on the outside and the good is on the inside, and keep on trying to find a way of becoming what I would so like to be, and could be, if there weren't any other people living in the world.
Anne Frank
Meghan said...

Powerful.

*mary* said...

Wow. I've never even thought of Anne Frank on film.

I just reread the diary this year. I recommend it to anyone who has never read it. It is so heartbreaking that she didn't live long enough to leave that place.

Elizabeth said...

God, yes. I can remember so vividly when I read her book. This inspired me to reread it. Thanks, Maggie. (and I gave you a shout-out over at my blog!)

Laura Lee said...

thank you for this. What a great little quote! never heard it before. I shall keep it in my heart.

Annabelle said...

I saw this on the news yesterday! It's so great that she's on film, watched this over and over just now - thanks so much for posting :-)

Lydia said...

When I saw this online I watched it so many times that day. The whole scene is surreal and who ever thought we'd get a look at Anne in movement of any kind. Didn't the streets look idyllic?

I read her diary at that age also. After I finished the book I remember holing up in my room, telling the family to leave me alone. It is my first memory of the mourning process.

Theresia said...

U make me cry...she's such a remembrance.
Thank you for sharing, Maggie, one should at least know how innocent she was to die with such a way.

Mwa said...

She's become a part of so many lives. I think if you read her diary at the right time (like you and me) she stays with you forever.

Beth said...

That quotation breaks my heart.
What a wise and gifted child she was.

Heather said...

I need to read her diary again. She was one of the reason I started keeping my own journal. Thanks to her, I now have 25 years of memories to read through.

Harlow said...

I too was 12 when I read Anne Frank's dairy and it just moved me to tears...
There's a book called Torn Thread I'd like to recommend if you ever come across it in a book store. It's the true story of two young sisters who survived the holocaust and it gives a really vivid account of life in a concentration camp. And unlike the story of Anne Frank, this one has a happy ending atleast...

Petit fleur said...

The timing of this post is odd for me. I have been listening to too much NPR and feeling deflated about the state of things worldwide, but specifically, here.

I have been thinking and feeling like all this conservatism and hate in the name of "God" is no different than the Nazi movement. They are out to destroy and chip away anyone who doesn't conform to their views. No mercy, no heart, no mind, no love, just mean, cold dogma. It's scary as hell to me.

Petit fleur said...

If you want to learn something really scary, check out where all the particularly cruel Nazi scientists who were conducting all sorts of horrific experiments on people during that time ended up after the war... Many of them came here to work for our government.

Sort of makes a person wonder...?

Laura said...

I need to reread her diary. I did a huge project on her in the 7th grade.

erin said...

I've read the diary so many times in my life.

I used to sit in my attic bedroom and think about how gut-wrenching it would be not to be able to walk down the steps and out the door...and not to understand the horrors outside waiting to snatch me up.

It makes my heart beat faster just thinking about it.

Sarcastic Bastard said...

The quote is heartbreaking.

Sending love,

SB

Ruth said...

What a striking quote. Thanks so much for sharing!

Shaista said...

But the extraordinary thing is the way she has lived so much more deeply than all those 'other people living in the world'. She turned her own heart inside out for generations of us readers, teaching us all how to write truthfully. So moving that the film clip is about her looking out of a window, on to life below, on to weddings and bicycles..
Do young boys read this book do you think? Have your sons?

Phoenix said...

That girl changed the world. Not many can say that their tragedies informed and illuminated the outside world, cracking in just a little bit of light into such a dark time...

bless Anne Frank.

mosey along said...

I'm 42 and I still re-read the Diary every year or two. It's just as heartbreaking and head-shakingly beautiful as it was when I was 12.

Alix said...

One of my all time favorite books is the Diary of Anne Frank. So tragic and haunting... and yet hopeful.

I never knew Anne had been captured on film. She looks like any other girl, leaning out of any other window, at any other moment in time.

I hate that her time was taken away from her, and us.

yolanda said...

WHAT ABOUT THE JOURNALS OF HELLEN KERR OR HELEN KELLER?
THE LAST DISCOVERY OF JOURNALS OF THAT WAR.

LOVE YOU, MY DEARLING!!
LETTER SOON

YOLANDA

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